Volume 6, Issue 2, March 2017, Page: 24-31
Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Among Mothers Towards Insecticide-Treated Nets in Abuharira Village -Um Remta Locality- The White Nile State -2015
Tayseir T. M. Masaad, Department of Health Education, Faculty of Public and Environmental Health, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Yousif M. Elmosaad, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Health Informatics, Qassim University, Albukayriyah, KSA
Abd Elbasit Elawad Mohammed, Department of Health Education, Faculty of Public and Environmental Health, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
Ahmed Elnadif Elmanssury, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Health Informatics, Qassim University, Albukayriyah, KSA
Mahmoud Jaber, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Health Informatics, Qassim University, Albukayriyah, KSA
Mustafa M. Mustafa, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Health Informatics, Qassim University, Albukayriyah, KSA
Husam Edrees, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Health Informatics, Qassim University, Albukayriyah, KSA; Department of Physiology, Faculty of medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt
Received: Mar. 13, 2017;       Accepted: Mar. 24, 2017;       Published: Apr. 1, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjcm.20170602.11      View  2029      Downloads  194
Abstract
Malaria is the most prevalent parasitic endemic disease in North Sudan, 75% of the total population is at risk. WHO recommends the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) an effective malaria control strategy. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of mother’s about Insecticide-Treated Nets as one of the preventive measures against malaria. This is a descriptive community based study of (295) mothers living in Abo Harira village in North Sudan. The pre-tested structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Multivariate logistic regression was used to study association between the dependent and independent variables, using Spss version 20. The study showed that more than half (55.9%) of mothers had good knowledge regarding ITNs, In spite of good knowledge about ITNs, (66.8 %( of mothers still had negative attitude and only (27.8%) reported always sleeping under it. Multivariate analysis suggested that mothers aged ≤31 years were more likely to have good knowledge about ITNs compared with mother with age ≥ 32 years [OR; 0.5174 (95% CI: 0.2974-0.9001)]. Similarly, mothers who had formal education were more likely to have knowledge about ITNs, two time higher than those with informal education [OR; 2.2 (95% CI: 1.274-3.788)]. We observed that mothers with age ≤31 years had positive attitudes towards ITNs [OR=0.461; 95%CI= (0.2578-0.8232)]. In addition, mothers with formal education were more likely to have positive attitude toward ITNs two time higher than those with informal education [OR; 1.99 (95% CI: 1.1182-3.5731)]. Only association between income and practice is evident. Higher income group is more likely to practice preventive activities two time higher than those with low income group [OR; 1.69 (95% CI: 1.0158-2.8214)]. We Conclude that the attitude and practice of mothers to ITNs in this study was poor. Multivariate analysis revealed that knowledge of mothers about ITNs has significant association with age and education, also illustrate that mothers attitude towards ITNs has significant association with age, mother’s work, education and monthly income. Therefore, Education System and the Malaria Control Programme in North Sudan should work closely, especially on malaria education for behaviour change as a key element for increasing utilization of ITNs.
Keywords
Malaria, Insect Treated Nets (ITNs), Mothers, Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices
To cite this article
Tayseir T. M. Masaad, Yousif M. Elmosaad, Abd Elbasit Elawad Mohammed, Ahmed Elnadif Elmanssury, Mahmoud Jaber, Mustafa M. Mustafa, Husam Edrees, Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Among Mothers Towards Insecticide-Treated Nets in Abuharira Village -Um Remta Locality- The White Nile State -2015, Science Journal of Clinical Medicine. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2017, pp. 24-31. doi: 10.11648/j.sjcm.20170602.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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